Tag: Indoor Cycling

Indoor Cycling 101 – Resistance and Cadence

Indoor cycling is an effective, low-impact way to break a sweat, but you want to make sure you are getting the most out of every session. Like I say it is a democracy in my session, I suggest the speed via the song and the resistance, you decide if you wish to do the work. Training principles apply to indoor cycling sessions Individuality, specificity, adaptability, progressive overload, adaptation, recovery, reversibility (more on these in another post). Working against an opposing force builds muscle, so in order to increase your strength capacity, you need to add resistance. Pedaling with very low…

Indoor Cycling 201 – The Pedal Stroke

Understanding the pedal stroke is key to getting more out of each revolution. In this article we look at the leg muscles involved in moving the pedal through 1 cycle. Down Stroke – Push At the top of the pedal stroke (00H00/12H00) position the main muscles used are the gluteal muscles. They are responsible for hip extension (straightening of hip joint) At 01H30 the knee extension (straightening) begins. The muscles responsible for this are on the front of the thigh (quadriceps aka. Quads) The 2 Muscle groups Glutes and Quads work together from 01H30 – 04H00 to extend the hip…

Indoor Cycling 101 – Hands & Body Positions

This post further expands on your posture on the bike. I explain the hand positions as well as body positioning. Hand Positions Hand position 1 Place your hands next to each other in the centre of the handlebars. You can use this in the seated position as well as during warm ups and cool downs. Hand position 2 Shift your hands wider than position 1, keeping them at the bottom of the handlebars, nearly in the groves where the handlebars curve forward. You can use this when seated or standing as well as during seated climbs, sprints and jumps. Hand…

Indoor Cycling 101 – Posture

In any sport, especially ones that require repetitive movements while in the same position, your posture is important.Cycling is one of those sport. Your posture not only helps you to avoid injury, it also makes sure that you are efficient. To get the most out of an indoor cycle class without injuring yourself, it’s important to adjust your bike settings to suit your body and to pay attention to your form throughout the ride. In an indoor class, the intensity of the training, coupled with the fact that you don’t have to deal with wind resistance or balance challenges, makes minding your posture even…

Indoor Cycling 101 – Bike Setup

Proper bike set-up matters, it is probably the most important aspect of the experience. Whether you are a beginner or pro at cycling having a trainer check on your bike modifications won’t hurt. For brand new riders, if you jump on the bike and start pedalling only to feel discomfort in ankles, knees or back, the wrong bike setup is the likely problem. A comfortable riding position affects your pedalling efficiency and your comfort. The more you finely tune the set up on your bike, the greater at ease you will be in class. Consider going fifteen minutes earlier to…

Indoor Cycling 101 – Safety

Group indoor cycling or spinning as it is commonly called, is quite popular in many health and fitness centres. There are health and safety issues that come with this popularity. You likely have seen video clips showing non-traditional activities on stationary bikes: riding hands-free while standing, shifting excessively from side to side while riding, pedalling excessively fast with no resistance, doing push-ups on the handlebars, lifting weights, bobbing up and down, or pushing the hips fore and aft, to only name a few. But should you perform these questionable techniques purely because of a desire to add entertainment and to…